© 2015 haascookzemmrich STUDIO2050
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Guggenheim | Helsinki, Finnland

Auslober the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Architekt haascookzemmrich  STUDIO2050
Partner in charge Martin Haas
Team Felix Beck, Hanxiao Liu (Phase 1)
  David Correa, Boris Rüther, Luis Ricardo, Aino Korhonen
  Sandro Ruiu, Rashmi Katkar, Georgios Albanis (Phase 2)
Planungsteam Ausstellungskonzept - Prof. HG Merz, Stuttgart
  Tragwerksplanung - Knippers & Helbig, Stuttgart
  Energiekonzept - Transsolar, Stuttgart
  Public Realm - Gehl Architects, Copenhagen
  Renderings - Moka-Studio
Wettbewerb 2015, Shortlist
Fläche 12.000 m2
   

 

Client the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation
Architect haascookzemmrich  STUDIO2050
Partner in charge Martin Haas
Project Team Felix Beck, Hanxiao Liu (1st phase)
  David Correa, Boris Rüther, Luis Ricardo, Aino Korhonen
  Sandro Ruiu, Rashmi Katkar, Georgios Albanis (2nd phase)
Consultant Team exhibition design - Prof. HG Merz, Stuttgart
  structural engineer - Knippers & Helbig, Stuttgart
  energy concept - Transsolar, Stuttgart
  public realm - Gehl Architects, Kopenhagen
  renderings - Moka-Studio
Competition 2015, Finalist
Area 12.000sqm
   

 

Helsinki Five - open up    Helsinki five is a cultural and sustainable approach for the Guggenheim Museum competition in Helsinki, Finland. Located at Helsinki Harbour, the five timber towers stand together to provide a new experience for the visitors.
Helsinki Five rethinks the conventional museum space; moving from a more-or-less neutral and more-or-less linear succession of rooms towards a multi-dimensional and responsive approach. Leaving behind the grand horizontal spaces that many of the world‘s museum projects have featured over the last decades, the proposal serves to strengthen the vertical dimension, and with it, generate multiple and unexpected connections between inside and outside, and between various program elements.
The cluster of towers reach out to the harbour and to the urban context in multiple ways; offering multiple uses for museum visitors as well as the surrounding community. Helsinki Five also offers remarkable views to its inhabitants and enhances the city landscape.
In Finland, wood accounts for about 40% of all building materials. Throughout its life-cycle, wood remains a low energy, renewable construction material, which also provides long-term carbon sequestration. Wood as a principle structural and cladding material speaks to Helsinki Five‘s sense of belonging - to a place, a culture, a lifecycle and a future. As land and sea converge, the wooden shingles of the façade embellish the waterfront and bow to the ancient architecture tradition of Finland.

Helsinki Five open up    Helsinki five is a cultural and sustainable approach for the Guggenheim Museum competition in Helsinki, Finland. Located at Helsinki Harbour, the five timber towers stand together to provide a new experience for the visitors.
Helsinki Five rethinks the conventional museum space; moving from a more-or-less neutral and more-or-less linear succession of rooms towards a multi-dimensional and responsive approach. Leaving behind the grand horizontal spaces that many of the world‘s museum projects have featured over the last decades, the proposal serves to strengthen the vertical dimension, and with it, generate multiple and unexpected connections between inside and outside, and between various program elements.
The cluster of towers reach out to the harbour and to the urban context in multiple ways; offering multiple uses for museum visitors as well as the surrounding community. Helsinki Five also offers remarkable views to its inhabitants and enhances the city landscape.
In Finland, wood accounts for about 40% of all building materials. Throughout its life-cycle, wood remains a low energy, renewable construction material, which also provides long-term carbon sequestration. Wood as a principle structural and cladding material speaks to Helsinki Five‘s sense of belonging - to a place, a culture, a lifecycle and a future. As land and sea converge, the wooden shingles of the façade embellish the waterfront and bow to the ancient architecture tradition of Finland.